LGBTQ Runs AMOK in CT

I’ve been a fan of motorsports, sticks-and-balls, slam dunks and run-jump-throw-athons all of my life. My first real job was as a sports writer. I probably know more about sports that the average Joe or Jane, though much less than walking encyclopedias like my Baby Sister Jean and Nephew Mark.

New England brings us a story this week that got me fired up. It blurs the line between sports contests and the battle of sexes. It’s getting a lot of deep thought and scholarly consideration. But it shouldn’t. When young men transitioning to female are allowed to compete as girls in high school sports, we have indeed crossed into the Twilight Zone. Roberta Serling would probably be amused if the situation wasn’t so patently stupid and unfair. Elements of our society are trying so hard to be inclusive and empathetic that they’re embracing absurd positions.

I’m a bit of a science denier. I don’t bow at the carbon footprint of Al Gore, and I’m mindful that Charles Darwin’s theory is, indeed, a theory. I fret about a modern-day Dr. Frankenstein playing petri-dish cloning god. But this time, by golly, I’ve got the science on my side. Here’s a news flash: Men and women are created equal, but for heaven’s sakes we are not created the same. I present Exhibits A, B, C and D, Your Honors.

Bruce Jenner, 1976: World’s Greatest Athlete wins decathlon gold in Montreal. Today, Caitlyn Jenner is the highest profile transsexual female in sports, if not the world.,

Exhibit A– Remember when you were five and walked in on your brother or sister in the bathroom, or when you took Dixie Lee or Jimmy Joe up on their “I’ll show you mine” challenge? That was about the time you began to understand why urinals are only in the rooms marked Gents. It was about the time moms and aunts and sisters first asserted their God-given right to expect “down and dry” toilet seats. Common sense conclusion: Both our toilets and our bio plumbing come in two styles. We look different.

Exhibit B: Science and biology are not my thing. But I’ve learned a few basic facts along the way, and I’ve marveled at athletes from Willie Mays to Nancy Lopez … from Kareem Abdul Jabbar to Chris Everts … from Jim Brown to Shirley Muldowny … from Billy Jean King to (not so much) Bobby Riggs … from Nadia Comaneci to Wayne Gretzky … from Lindsey Vonn to Tiger Woods. I never showed them mine (or saw theirs) but I can say with absolute confidence that a cursory peek would reveal exactly what Dixie Lee and Jimmy Joe would expect. Our biologies differ in fundamental ways, some of which are tied to physical capacity. We are constructed differently.

Billie Jean King put the hurt on Bobby Riggs in the Battle of the Sexes. An aging male of modest talent, Riggs was shunked by Billie Jean King at the top of her game.

Exhibit C: The Old Testament tells us that God knew us before he knitted us in the womb. Sure enough, one sperm and one egg are all it takes to set the plan in motion. Every baby develops differently, and we are all unique individuals, but our sex is determined at conception. We get 10 fingers and 10 toes and 23 pair of chromosomes. Girls’ are of the XX variety and boys get an X and a Y. Equal? Absolutely. The same? Absolutely not. We are different.

Exhibit D: Small boys and girls are often of comparable athletic ability, but at puberty the worm turns. Girls sprout breasts and begin to menstruate. Boys become more hairy and their voices change. Girls grow incrementally, boys in sometimes explosive spurts. Once equal abilities are soon a mile apart. In their prime men are bigger, stronger and faster than women. In most (but not all) sports, elite males will easily defeat elite females. There’s a mountain of data to support this, but two eyes are all that’s needed: Two eyes, and two record books. Our performance pinnacles are different.

Enter Connecticut’s State Off-The-Tracks Meet

Young men who transition to female deserve love, respect and emotional support. They have both human and legal rights. For them to be allowed to compete against girls in high school track meets, however, is patently unfair. Many things change in transsexual individuals, but the innate “bigger, faster, stronger” combination endures. I won’t name the athletes in question. They combined for two championships and one runner-up finish in sprint events. I can assure you that many of the girls they defeated were better athletes. Taint fair.

A transgender female of above average XY-variety ability will consistently and decisively defeat elite XX girls. I sympathize with the kid who identifies as female, I truly do. But I sympathize much more with girls from birth who have championship hopes unfairly trampled in the name of political-gender correctness run amok.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s